Medical Improv is Relevant to Outcomes You Seek!

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“Beth created a wonderful presentation on Medical Improv for NAIMP.org (National Association of IndependentAAEAAQAAAAAAAAM1AAAAJGNlNjUxOTRjLTcxYWQtNDY4MS05MWI0LTA3YzMxMDNiYjU3Yw Medical Practices) teaching us how our language effects patient safety, collaboration and communication. It was great information for our listeners and we hope she will return to speak again. “–Shirley Cress Dudley, MA LPC NCC FACMPE CMPE

People skills are essential. Medical Improv is the process! Click To Tweet

Here are the links for the Med Improv webinar and podcast!

And three related posts:

A powerful teaching moment with 1 doctor and 2 nurses

What I learned about my own assertiveness in a silly improv activity:  Death in One Minute

Using Status Behaviors Wisely as Clinicians

Please let me know if you’d like to learn more, set up a workshop or spice up your conference! beth@bethboynton.com!

This entry was posted in Assertiveness, Communication in Healthcare, Complexity in nursing, Diversity, Healthy Workplaces, Holistic Health, Listening, Medical Improv, Medication Errors, Nurse Entreprenuers, Nurse Leadership, Patient Advocacy, Patient Safety, Teambuilding and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

12 Responses to Medical Improv is Relevant to Outcomes You Seek!

  1. Elizabeth Scala says:

    Love it! So glad you are taking this on with full force, Beth. Doing great work. Sharing now.

  2. allewellyn says:

    I never had any experience in this type of activity, but since meeting Beth, I am intrigued. The only impro I know if from the TV station Whose Line is This Anyway. Watched it a few times…..and always thought it was interesting. Looking into ways to get Beth to come to South Florida so we can experience this way of learning.

    • Beth_Boynton_RN_MS says:

      Thanks, Anne. I’d love to teach some workshops in Florida and open to negotiating ways to make it happen. One of the key differences between Improv Comedy and Medical Improv is the shift in teaching focus away from performance and towards individual and group process learning. It is still fun and there are rich gains for everyone in emotional intelligence, communication, critical thinking, flexibility, spontaneity…all sorts of exciting stuff for us in healthcare!

  3. Pingback: A Powerful Teaching Moment for 2 Nurses & 1 Doctor

  4. Pingback: Using Status Behaviors Wisely as Clinicians

  5. Pingback: Med Improv Articles

  6. Beth_Boynton_RN_MS says:

    Thanks for asking, Brittney. Some of the magic involved in participating in these activities is that anyone who is willing to grow their interpersonal and communication skills along with their emotional intelligence will benefit. In fact, if you and I were doing an activity together we could both develop listening and speaking up skills, become more able to think on our feet and develop a respectful relationship with each other all of which are really helpful in collaborating in the clinical environment. Plus, we get a chance to have fun together! Ultimately the willingness to try something ‘out-of-the-box’ that will help us provide safer, quality care are more important in the success of med improv than any particular specialty, This post gives more insight how behaviors from a variety of professionals working in a hospital can shift towards more collaborative behaviors. http://bit.ly/1ehkg50
    This on is about how a program might unfold on a Med-surg unit: http://bit.ly/1rnj9eV

  7. Beth,
    What sort of healthcare professionals benefit from medical improv? Is it just doctors and nurses? A certain type or experienced nurse?

  8. Pingback: What I Learned @ My Own Assertiveness in a Silly Improv Game: Death in One Minute

What are your thoughts?