4 Essential Communication Skills that Promote Patient Safety (Objectives & Curriculum for Online CE)

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Recently, FierceHealthcare, reporter Leslie Small’s article Hospitals stagnate on patient safety outcomes, reminds us about the challenges we continue to face with medical errors.  And sentinel event data consistently points out the links between catastrophic errors and communication and behavior.

Communication skills involve behaviors that can be very tough to learn especially in the high stakes high stress roles that nurses are working in every minute.  Not only that, but until we fully appreciate how complex they are to learn and practice we run the risk of thinking we already know how to.

In the online CE course I created with Pedagogy Online Learning Systems, 4 Essential Communication Skills that Promote Patient Safety, the first half students learn about the underlying behaviors that are interfering with our ability to provide safe care and why what may look simple, is not!  While the second half is devoted to delegation, limit-setting, and giving and receiving constructive feedback!   Check out the objectives and curriculum below or follow this link for more info.  (2 CEs/$20)

Objectives: Part I

  1. Discuss how key reports by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and various journals have highlighted serious and persistent issues in patient safety.
  2. Explain how Root Cause Analysis of Sentinel Events provides incentive to develop and practice effective and respectful communication.
  3. Identify communication skills associated with categories and subcategories of root causes of sentinel events using data from The Joint Commission.
  4. Explain how basic understanding in assertiveness, listening, and emotional intellfooter-logoigence are key for setting limits, delegation, and giving and receiving constructive feedback.

Objectives: Part II

  1. Differentiate effective and respectful limit setting in common situations in nursing practice.
  2. Differentiate effective and respectful delegation of tasks in common situations in nursing practice.
  3. Differentiate effective and respectful giving constructive feedback in common situations in nursing practice.
  4. Differentiate effective and respectful receiving constructive feedback in common situations in nursing practice.

Curriculum

Chapter 1:  A Brief History of Patient Safety

  • Thousands of years ago-The Hippocratic Oath
  • 1800s-Florence Nightingale reiterated the Hippocratic Oath
  • 1999-IOM Report: 44,000-98,000 deaths/year in associated with medical errors in U.S. Hospitals
  • 2009-The Joint Commission ranks medical errors as the 5th leading cause of death in the U.S.
  • 2011-Health Affairs-Adverse events ten times greater than previously believed and occurring in 1/3rd of hospital admissions. 187,000 deaths in hospitals/year and 6.1 Million injuries (in and out of hospitals)/year
  • 2013-Journal of Patient Safety-440,000 deaths/year associated with medical errors in hospitals making medical errors the 3rd leading cause of death in the U.S.
  • 2014-U.S. Senate hearing on patient safety-testimony by Dr. Aja-overall lack of progress.

Chapter 2:  Sentinel Events

  • Definition
  • Tracking by The Joint Commission
  • Types and related statistics over time

Chapter 3:  Root Cause Analysis

  • Definition
  • Purpose
  • Root Causes of Sentinel Events per The Joint Commission

Chapter 4:  Categories and Subcategories of Leading Root Causes of Sentinel Events

  • Human Factors
  • Leadership
  • Communication

Chapter 5:  Examining the Subcategories of Root Causes of Sentinel Events to Identify Communication-related Issues.

  • Human Factors:  Staffing levels etc.
  • Leadership:  Organizational planning etc.
  • Communication:  Oral, written etc.

Chapter 6:  Overview of Communication Strategies for Patient Safe Care

  • Delegation
  • Limit-setting
  • Giving constructive feedback
  • Receiving constructive feedback

Chapter 7:  Delegation

  • Process
  • Emotional intelligence
  • Examples from the field

Chapter 8:  Limit-setting

  • Process
  • Emotional intelligence
  • Examples from the field

Chapter 9:  Giving constructive feedback

  • Process
  • Emotional intelligence
  • Examples from the field

Chapter 10:  Receiving constructive feedback

  • Process
  • Emotional intelligence
  • Examples from the field

Copyright Beth Boynton 2015.

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